2.21.2013

inspired by...heartbreak

~HEARTBREAK~
any love story worth reading has got to have some element of it. and not exclusively romantic love stories. the book thief, for example, has multiple love stories all woven together, and i do believe my heart broke for each one at different points while reading.
so what is it about the broken heart that pulls and tugs at us? for me, identifying with someone else's hurt really gets me. if i care about the characters and their relationships and they're relatable? you've got me jumping in head first, my heart on my sleeve.
because the hope is that everything will work out for these people whose lives you've dived into. sometimes it does. sometimes it doesn't. i'm personally not a huge fan of typical happily ever afters, but if done well, i'm accepting.

the last thing i want to mention is that with heartbreak there are always two sides of the story - making it that much more intriguing, compelling, and confusing (in a good way). this video/song completely inspired this post (i seriously can't stop watching it):

how do you all write heartbreak? are you fond of happily ever after?
thanks to rhiann wynn-nolet for hosting THURSDAY'S CHILDREN - a weekly blog hop where writers come together to talk about whatever inspires them.

here's the linky, if you'd like to hop on board:

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24 comments:

  1. Yes, heartbreak. A universal human condition. I don't really like happily ever afters because I don't think the world works that way... it's too simple. My favorite stories are the ones that highlight the grey area between black and white, where most of love and hate and everything else lies. That said, I've read a few "uplifting" endings that can break your heart too (like The Giver!) :)

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  2. Oooh, great post! My novels have both heartbreak and happy endings, in some form or another, because I agree with Jeannette. Real life contains both.

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  3. Ultimately, I guess I'm looking for a satisfying ending - which isn't always a happy one, I guess. I don't like everything tied up in a neat little bow...but at the end of a book or a series, I would like there to be more positive than negative. I want to know that the main character didn't suffer for nothing. Which is why I don't read a ton of literary fiction, because I choose poorly whenever I do and the characters end up more miserable than they were when the book started. :)

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    1. I agree Chris. I want to feel satisfied in that there is at least hope for the MC...despite all of the horrible things that may have occurred along her journey.

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  4. First, I don't know why the Linky is showing only some blogs and not others...STUPID tech stuff! Anyway, so far all my stories have happy endings though some really bad stuff always happens in the middle. While I've thought of alternative tragic endings I don't use them. I don't want to give that message to my YA audience (assuming I have one some day) and I fall in love with my characters to the degree that I WANT them to be happy.

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    1. Crazy Linky... Thanks for stopping by to admire my techno skilz. They'll be gone by next week...

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  5. It's funny I love to write heartbreaking scenes, but I don't necessarily like to read them. There's something to be said for going through the emotional wringer with a character, but I like to be left with a modicum of hope at the end that it is if not happily ever after - at least better.

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  6. I think I've grown impatient with hearbreak over the years. I just broke up with a novel I LOVED only two chapters from the end because I just couldn't put up with the MC's reluctance/heartbreak/angst. When one has the daily business of dishes, laundry, homework, rides to school and ballet inj the snowy weather, homeschooling about the Westward Migration, juggling funds for bills, teaching your toddler her numbers, making a dinner out of not-much-in-the-cupboard, getting to work on time and doing it...I say, "Get a real problem! Pull up your bootstrappers an get on with it--will ye?"
    Sigh. I've no time for heartbreak. Happily Ever After is getting through life gracefully with the cards you've been dealt--and finding the blessing in it.
    Sign me pragmatic this morning. (I sound rather like an old woman.)
    ~Just Jill

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    1. Ha! Oh real life... That's really what I meant. Not a fairytale ending, but that heartbreak can occur (and it doesn't have to be teen angsty stuff), and the MC can still have hope in the end.

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  7. I think heartbreak is awesome! (In fiction-writing... not so much in real life)

    Since the romance in my work is subtle, the heartbreak that I write about tends to be the platonic kind — losing someone you love, depend on, who you feel you need in order to live a normal life. So both of my MCs go through massive heartbreak at the beginning of my WIP.

    BUT, the good thing about heartbreaks: although they represent the end of one era, they also represent the beginning of a new and different one. What's more inspiring than that?

    Thanks for sharing!

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    1. I like that - yes! Heartbreak brings about new beginnings.

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  8. I'm a big fan of the happily ever after. Or at least the happy for the near foreseeable future. As John said though, heartbreaks also signify change and hope. That's kind of cool when you think about it.

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    1. It is totally cool. Thanks for stopping by Jaye :)

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  9. I so don't do happily ever after in my writing. But I like reading them. (Hypocritical much?)

    I like the pictures in this post. :)

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    1. Thanks Jessie. The photos are from an artist on Etsy - thePhotoZoo. Check her out, she's crazy talented!

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  10. Such a great post. I think heartbreak in a novel is such a strong component. It really makes the readers feel the pain as well. It connects you to the characters because we feel heartbreak in our real world...not just through the pages of a book. That connection unifies us.

    Love the photos and that song is one of my favorite!

    Thanks for posting.

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  11. I'm also a writing sadist. I live to make my characters miserable ;-) Like they say, no one ever writes songs about getting a raise. Hurts so good all the way!

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    1. Definitely Kristina... Thanks for reading!

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  12. I'm with you. I love emotions in my reading or writing. Feelings make or break the book. I write both happily-ever-after and heartbreak tales, but my favorites are the stories where both pain and happiness happen.

    I love the pictures you've picked for post, by the way. I will check out the site and the artist. Thanks.

    http://www.miaceleste.com/?p=213

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    1. Thank Mia and definitely check the photographer out..she's fantastic!

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